The Devil Take Tomorrow

George Washington has been marked for death. British agents embedded in the Continental Army wait only for the order to strike. Racing against time, rebel spy Ethan Matlock sets out to protect the one man who can save the Revolution. Without General Washington, the whole American enterprise might easily collapse, for no one else has demonstrated the ability to keep together an army that constantly threatens to fall apart.

Boldly Ethan infiltrates the heart of the British military, occupiers of grand old Philadelphia, where elegant officers posture in drawing rooms and frolic in the bedrooms of the rich. Surrounded by twenty thousand redcoats, aware that the slightest misstep could lead to the gallows, Ethan resorts to vicious measures to unravel a conspiracy of power-hungry men. Against his better judgment, he becomes entangled with the provocative Miss Maddie Graves, whose fierce devotion to the American cause ironically threatens his mission.

 

Synopsis
George Washington has been marked for death. British agents embedded in the Continental Army wait only for the order to strike. Racing against time, rebel spy Ethan Matlock sets out to protect the one man who can save the Revolution. Without General Washington, the whole American enterprise might easily collapse, for no one else has demonstrated the ability to keep together an army that constantly threatens to fall apart. Boldly Ethan infiltrates the heart of the British military, occupiers of grand old Philadelphia, where elegant officers posture in drawing rooms and frolic in the bedrooms of the rich. Surrounded by twenty thousand redcoats, aware that the slightest misstep could lead to the gallows, Ethan resorts to vicious measures to unravel a conspiracy of power-hungry men. Against his better judgment, he becomes entangled with the provocative Miss Maddie Graves, whose fierce devotion to the American cause ironically threatens his mission.
Hello Friends! My name is Gretchen Jeannette. I live and work in Chester County, Pennsylvania, an area rich in Revolutionary War and Colonial American history. My enduring interest in 18th Century America began at a young age, inspired by the novels of Dale Van Every and Allan Eckert, whose timeless tales of adventure and romance capture the essence of early American lore. Eager to read more such stories, to my disappointment I had trouble finding them on bookshelves. So I decided to write one of my own. Thus began a journey fueled by my passion to breathe life into history through believable characters, plots woven with adventure, romance and suspense and, of course, plenty of derring-do. Enjoy the ride…

Fiction becomes believable and fascinating in this poignant story by Gretchen Jeannette. Fans of historical fiction, romance, and war, especially adults and older teens, will love reading “The Devil Take Tomorrow”, as the author seamlessly weaves a riveting tale of love, drama, and the revolutionary era.

The story is realistic and grounded in actual reality, yet nothing about this tale is predicable. Instead, Gretchen Jeannette’s writing in “The Devil Take Tomorrow” will keep readers on the edge of their seats in anticipation as each page is turned.

With a letter of grave warning from the very start, the audience is thrown right into the world of this story, feeling very much a part of the action surrounding the characters. This only serves to make the tale more compelling and the story even more engrossing, as the reader is drawn in, wishing to learn more. The development of each character moves naturally as the story heightens in drama and magnitude, and continues throughout every conflict along the way.

A backdrop of the Revolutionary War serves to highlight the intensity of the tale right from the first scene down to the final page. Vivid descriptions rich with detail add spice to the already intriguing narrative. The characters are deeply interesting, and find themselves imbedded in a world well painted by Gretchen Jeannette’s written voice. Each character is passionate, no matter if their motives are selfish or selfless, and this lends an authenticity to the story as a whole. While there are certainly twists and turns guaranteed to feed a reader’s excitement, this story is surprisingly easy to follow and quick to read. Gretchen Jeannette’s writing goes far and beyond expectations in “The Devil Take Tomorrow”, and is thoroughly entertaining. Due to all of this, “The Devil Take Tomorrow” comes recommended for purchase as well as sharing with family and friends. – GoodbooksToday.com Reviews

The Devil Take Tomorrow is an epic read in every sense of the word; definitely one for the smart and committed readers out there. It is a piece of historical fiction, set during the American Revolution, which follows Ethan Matlock as he sets out to protect George Washington and save the revolution. He courageously infiltrates the British army, but complications arise in the form of a lady by the name of Maddie Graves, putting the entire mission at risk.

Gretchen Jeannette bears the stroke of a master. There is a wonderful balance to her writing, with word choices that deliver impact and set each scene perfectly. Every page ticks along at a perfect pace, every sequence being necessary or interesting in some way, and helping to provide an engaging reading experience. The attention to detail impresses as Jeannette succeeds in bringing the time period to life with authentic details and believable characters.

Emotional intensity and complexity of interactions are elements that are difficult for any author to pull off, however, Jeannette has done this effortlessly, helping the reader to understand each individual's motivations for irrational behaviors that make them seem all the more human. There is nothing simplistic or generic about this book, yet I still found it to be an easy read and it seemed shorter than it is because it is so absorbing. - E-book Planet Reviews

Filled with action, intrigue, and romance, The Devil Take Tomorrow transports the reader to a defining moment of the American Revolution. Ethan Matlock is a Continental soldier charged with a perilous mission: infiltrating the British Army to foil an assassination attempt upon General George Washington. Using his quick wit and irresistible charms, Matlock immediately plants himself within the social circle of the masterminds behind the attempt, but soon becomes distracted by the beautiful (and fiercely patriotic) Maddie Graves, the niece of a British Loyalist. As Ethan becomes entrenched in his double life, time is running out to save George Washington, and the fate of a nation hangs in the balance.

The Devil Take Tomorrow is a captivating novel that will please lovers of historical fiction, especially those with an interest in the Revolutionary War. According to her biography, the author is an enthusiast of eighteenth-century American history, and did extensive research into the period to deliver a story that is as accurate as it is entertaining. While I am no expert on the American Revolution, some of the details of the novel prompted me to conduct my own research via the Internet, and I was impressed with my findings. In addition, I learned some things about the Revolutionary War that I did not know prior to reading this book.

The plot moves at a breakneck pace, and is combined with a writing style that provides vivid mental pictures of the characters and settings without being overly tedious. As I read, the story unfolded before me as though I was watching a movie. In my mind's eye, I could clearly see the blood-red uniforms of the British officers, elegant ladies in their voluminous gowns, and the stately mansion in which Ethan stays as a guest.

The character development is no less superb. Ethan is a multi-layered protagonist, charming and extremely loyal to his cause, but also not without his share of inner demons. Maddy is fiery, intelligent, and utterly defiant of the expectations of a woman of her station. The villains are thoroughly detestable, but the author avoids painting all British soldiers in a negative light, as so many stories about this period are wont to do. On the contrary, it's made very clear that there are good and bad people on both sides of the conflict.

I don't have any actual criticisms of this book, although I feel the need to warn readers about some of the content. There are some depictions of violence toward women, as well as references to rape. Nothing is graphic, but those who are easily upset by this material might want to avoid this book.

I enjoyed reading The Devil Take Tomorrow and rate it 4 out of 4 stars. Although I have already recommended this book to history lovers, I believe that it has diverse appeal and would be appreciated by a wide range of readers. - Onlinebookclub.org Reviews

Ethan Matlock, the dashing, dangerous hero of Gretchen Jeannette’s The Devil Take Tomorrow, is spy for the rebelling American colonies, navigating the demimonde of British-occupied Philadelphia, when he learns of a plot involving British agents masquerading as colonial soldiers. These agents intend to kidnap General George Washington, and as Ethan soon learns, their plans are maturing rapidly – he must act soon or the Revolution will lose its much-vaunted “indispensable man.”

Even so, a spy’s life is dictated by the need for discretion, and that discretion is put at risk by the volatile and fiery-tempered rebel sympathizer Maddie Graves.

In tense drawing rooms all over town and in action sequences on land and at sea, Jeannette moves her plot along at a rapid-fire pace. Although the romantic badinage between Ethan and Maddie may strike some readers as a bit forced, the novel ends up feeling far more textured and authentic than a by-the-numbers romance – especially convincing is the real sense that is conveyed of how fragile the rebellion is at this point, how much of it hinges on the actions of just a few men and women on either side. - Historical Novel Society