I've always written, ever since I can remember. My first job was as a reporter with the Liverpool Daily Post (in UK) - and I was terrible! As soon as possible I switched to feature writing and, when inspiration struck, to comic verse.
I’ve loved to write since I was a little girl. When I was ten, I read a book called, Sal Fisher at Girl Scout Camp. At that moment, I decided I wanted to write my own books. So with lined paper and fountain pen, I wrote Beverly Knauer at Girl Scout Camp. Not very original,
What inspired me to write was my love of books. It was a logical leap from loving to read the printed word to trying to become a writer.And both reading and writing have always proved the salve to my soul.
A long-time work colleague and friend suggested I write a novel. This was in 2011 when we were on the brink of retiring. While I wrote numerous technical reports over a number of years, I had never thought of writing fiction.
In the late 1990s, my cousin Jacquelin Thomas became a published author. I was so inspired by her stories and style of writing that in 1999 I began writing my first manuscript and finished it in 2000.
To a certain extent it was the authors I read and admired. Mann, Updike, Huxley, Faulkner and others. Additionally, there were some things I wanted to share with anyone who wanted to read. Eveyr so often sometime would tell me, "You have to write that down."
I knew I liked writing when I was in the sixth grade. I loved writing stories and I had a teacher (Mrs. Gooch) who encouraged me. My mother also bought me books and took me often to the library--a place that I found magical and magnetic. She often read to me and I could "see"
The first time that words absolutely poured out of me was in my mid-twenties when the government invited the public to write in to a commission on the important issues of the day. Apparently I or the universe had much to say. This was before word processors and in one day I produced 5000 handwritten
I was once arrested by the KGB in the Soviet Union for smuggling banned books to dissidents. As I left the country one said, "We better not see anything about this in print or next time we won't be so humanistic." It gave me the idea to write about it.